What is your favorite sutta? What about one that, if you had to pick only one sutta to read for the rest of your life, your desert island sutta, which would it be?

Personally, my go to sutta is the Magga Vibhanga sutta SN 45.8, because it is easy to memorize, and comprehensive, so long as one knows a few extra points. As to which I’d pick to be my desert island sutta, probably dn 22, the Maha Satipatthana sutta.

I also really love the Anattalakkhana sutta SN 22.59. It is critically important to understanding the dhamma, as anatta is a key concept.

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Yes, so many favorites. I have grown to like the 2. Mahārāhulovādasuttaṃ MN 62. This sutta is actually required by the commentary for all monks to give a dhamma talk on (memorize) for release from dependence from a teacher.

I started to memorize it in Pali last year, but never finished. I might try again later.
I really like how much is packed into the sutta.

  • ānāpānassati
  • 32 Parts
  • 5 Elements
  • Metta
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I’ve always liked MN 140

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(1) Anattalakkhana sutta is my favourite for contemplating the Dhamma.

(2)“Atanatiya rakkha” given by Vessavana Maharaja in Atanatiya sutta, for inspire confidence and respect towards all Seven Sammasambuddhas and invoke protection. I memorised the first part and recite in heart or in front of the altar before I leave my house everyday.

I often chant these two scriptures too.

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Thanks for sharing :slight_smile: What do you like about it?

I agree, Anattalakkhana is amazing! It is the testing ground for any philosophical theory or position, and, none stand up to it lol!

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I will read this sutta tomorrow! Thank you Venerable!

I find it has some beautiful phrases. For example

“Bhikkhu, this person consists of six elements, six bases of contact, and eighteen kinds of mental exploration, and he has four foundations. The tides of conceiving do not sweep over one who stands upon these foundations, and when the tides of conceiving no longer sweep over him he is called a sage at peace. One should not neglect wisdom, should preserve truth, should cultivate relinquishment, and should train for peace…“Therefore a bhikkhu possessing this wisdom possesses the supreme foundation of wisdom. For this, bhikkhu, is the supreme noble wisdom, namely, the knowledge of the destruction of all suffering.

“His deliverance, being founded upon truth, is unshakeable. For that is false, bhikkhu, which has a deceptive nature, and that is true which has an undeceptive nature—Nibbāna. Therefore a bhikkhu possessing this truth possesses the supreme foundation of truth. For this, bhikkhu, is the supreme noble truth, namely, Nibbāna, which has an undeceptive nature.

“Formerly, when he was ignorant, he undertook and accepted acquisitions; now he has abandoned them, cut them off at the root, made them like a palm stump, done away with them so that they are no longer subject to future arising. Therefore a bhikkhu possessing this relinquishment possesses the supreme foundation of relinquishment. For this, bhikkhu, is the supreme noble relinquishment, namely, the relinquishing of all acquisitions.

“Formerly, when he was ignorant, he experienced covetousness, desire, and lust; now he has abandoned them, cut them off at the root, made them like a palm stump, done away with them so that they are no longer subject to future arising. Formerly, when he was ignorant, he experienced anger, ill will, and hate; now he has abandoned them, cut them off at the root, made them like a palm stump, done away with them so that they are no longer subject to future arising. Formerly, when he was ignorant, he experienced ignorance and delusion; now he has abandoned them, cut them off at the root, made them like a palm stump, done away with them so that they are no longer subject to future arising. Therefore a bhikkhu possessing this peace possesses the supreme foundation of peace. For this, bhikkhu, is the supreme noble peace, namely, the pacification of lust, hate, and delusion.

“So it was with reference to this that it was said: ‘One should not neglect wisdom, should preserve truth, should cultivate relinquishment, and should train for peace.’

“‘The tides of conceiving do not sweep over one who stands upon these foundations, and when the tides of conceiving no longer sweep over him he is called a sage at peace.’ So it was said. And with reference to what was this said?

“Bhikkhu, ‘I am’ is a conceiving; ‘I am this’ is a conceiving; ‘I shall be’ is a conceiving; ‘I shall not be’ is a conceiving; ‘I shall be possessed of form’ is a conceiving; ‘I shall be formless’ is a conceiving; ‘I shall be percipient’ is a conceiving; ‘I shall be non-percipient’ is a conceiving; ‘I shall be neither-percipient-nor-non-percipient’ is a conceiving. Conceiving is a disease, conceiving is a tumour, conceiving is a dart. By overcoming all conceivings, bhikkhu, one is called a sage at peace. And the sage at peace is not born, does not age, does not die; he is not shaken and does not yearn. For there is nothing present in him by which he might be born. Not being born, how could he age? Not ageing, how could he die? Not dying, how could he be shaken? Not being shaken, why should he yearn?

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Fantastic thanks for sharing :slight_smile: